Vehicles: Common Data

NationAmountPercentage
U.S.S.R. 43
20%
U.S.A. 46
21%
U.K. 34
16%
Japan 13
6%
Germany 55
25%
France 28
13%
TypeAmountPercentage
Tank Destroyer 64
29%
Heavy Tank 43
20%
Light Tank 52
24%
Medium Tank 60
27%
TierAmountPercentage
I 6
3%
II 18
8%
III 20
9%
IV 22
10%
V 23
11%
VI 29
13%
VII 27
12%
VIII 27
12%
IX 23
11%
X 24
11%
Tank Nation Type Tier
AT-1
The AT-1 tank destroyer based on the T-26 light tank was developed by the construction bureau at the Experimental Design Mechanical Department of Factory No. 185 in Leningrad from 1935 through 1936. The vehicle was designed for anti-tank warfare. Two prototypes equipped with the 76.2 mm PS-3 tank guns were built, which underwent trials by 1936. This vehicle never saw mass production.
U.S.S.R. Tank Destroyer II
SU-76
Light vehicle with a 76-mm gun, the most widely produced Soviet SPG. Despite its weak armor and armament, the vehicle was used to support infantry and cavalry.
U.S.S.R. Tank Destroyer III
SU-85B
In April-May of 1943, the SU-85B tank destroyer designed by the Gorky Automobile Plant underwent trials. The vehicle was a modernization of the SU-85A and featured the artillery LB-2 gun, 160-hp engine, and SU-76M chassis. The cabin, drive wheels, and spare parts kits were redesigned. Only one prototype was built.
U.S.S.R. Tank Destroyer IV
SU-85
Developed on the basis of the T-34 medium tank and the SU-122 assault gun. Produced from August 1943 through July 1944. The 85-mm D-5S gun allowed the SU-85 to effectively hit enemy medium tanks at distances of more than 1,000 meters and to penetrate the front armor of heavy tanks at shorter distances.
U.S.S.R. Tank Destroyer V
SU-100
Tank destroyer on the basis of the T-34-85 and SU-85 with a total of 2,495 vehicles produced from September 1944 through June 1945. After the vehicle saw service, the Red Army praised it as a very effective tank destroyer with strong firepower, which could stand against any mass-produced German armored vehicle.
U.S.S.R. Tank Destroyer VI
SU-152
Development of a tank destroyer on the basis of the KV-1S heavy tank began on January 4, 1943. The vehicle received the designation KV-14 (Object 236). A prototype underwent field trials at the beginning of February 1943 and entered service on February 14, 1943. In April, the KV-14 was renamed SU-152. By December 1943, 670 vehicles were manufactured. Thanks to its ability to successfully combat german Tiger I and Panther tanks, the SU-152 was dubbed "Hunter" by the troops.
U.S.S.R. Tank Destroyer VII
SU-100M1
Developed in 1944 at the Uralmash heavy machinery plant, this vehicle was based on the T-34-85 tank. Its engine compartment was placed in the front of the hull, while the fighting compartment was located in the rear, which provided additional protection for the crew and considerably reduced the under armor hull volume. Although the SU-100M1 project was never manufactured, it was an intermittent stage in the development of the SU-100 and SU-101, both of which existed in reality.
U.S.S.R. Tank Destroyer VII
ISU-152
Developed on the basis of the IS tank. The ISU-152 was conceived as a replacement for the SU-152, which was based on the KV-1s chassis. A total of 4,635 vehicles were built from November 1943 through June 1945.
U.S.S.R. Tank Destroyer VIII
SU-101
In 1944 the Construction Bureau of the Ural Heavy Machinery Plant developed the SU-101 with the D-10S gun and the SU-102 with the D-25S gun. Both vehicles were designated as Uralmash-1. Prototypes were manufactured in April 1945. The vehicles never entered mass production nor saw service.
U.S.S.R. Tank Destroyer VIII
Object 704
Developed in 1945 on the basis of the IS-2 and IS-3 vehicles, under the supervision of Joseph Kotin. One of the distinctive features was the slope angle of armor plates. Passed trials successfully, but never entered service.
U.S.S.R. Tank Destroyer IX
SU-122-54
Development was started in the summer of 1948. The T-54 tank was used as a basis for this tank destroyer. The vehicle entered service in March 1954. Mass production was launched in 1955, with a total of 100 vehicles manufactured. The principal configuration of the vehicle is similar to the configuration of WWII assault guns.
U.S.S.R. Tank Destroyer IX
Object 268
Development of the Object 268 was started in the summer of 1952 at the Kirov Plant, Leningrad, under the supervision of Joseph Kotin. The vehicle was developed on the basis of the T-10 heavy tank. A prototype was manufactured in 1956. The vehicle passed trials, but never saw mass production.
U.S.S.R. Tank Destroyer X
Object 263
The development of a heavy tank destroyer on the basis of the IS-7 heavy tank was started in 1950. Three design projects were developed, one of which resulted in a full-size wooden prototype. However, further development was discontinued due to phasing out the IS-7 mass-production.
U.S.S.R. Tank Destroyer X
KV-1
Development started at the end of 1938. A prototype was produced in August 1939. The vehicle first saw combat in December 1939 at the Mannerheim Line. The tank was mass-produced from March 1940 through August 1942, with a total of 2,769 vehicles manufactured.
U.S.S.R. Heavy Tank V
KV-1S
A further modification of the KV-1 heavy tank series developed in the summer of 1942. It passed into Red Army service on August 20, 1942. Compared to its predecessors, KV-1S had several design features which allowed for the tank’s weight to be reduced to 42.3 tons. Also, the KV-1S had increased top speed, maneuverability, and durability. However, the 76-mm ZIS-5 gun remained. This, coupled with reduced and inefficient armoring, made the new vehicle basically equal to the Т-34 in terms of battle performance. A total of 1,083 vehicles of this modification were manufactured. This tank was widely used on all fronts of the Great Patriotic War.
U.S.S.R. Heavy Tank VI
KV-2
Heavy assault tank. Developed on the basis of the KV-1 in January 1940, with a total of 334 vehicles manufactured from 1940 through 1941. The KV-2 tanks were used in action in 1941, with most of the vehicles lost the same year.
U.S.S.R. Heavy Tank VI
T-150
The T-150 was a further development of the KV-1. The vehicle weighed as much as 50 tons. The T-150 underwent trials in the first half of 1941. A prototype fought in the battles for Leningrad, and became a basis for a modification of the KV-1 with reinforced armor.
U.S.S.R. Heavy Tank VI
IS
The IS-1 (IS-85) heavy tank was a thorough modernization of the KV-1. The tank featured the 85-mm D-5T gun. The IS-1 entered mass production in October 1943, but work was discontinued at the beginning of 1944, as the IS-2 (IS-122) tank entered mass production in December 1943. A total of 107 vehicles were manufactured.
U.S.S.R. Heavy Tank VII
KV-3
Developed on the basis of the KV heavy tank, the vehicle initially had very few differences from the mass-produced model. It underwent field trials in January–February 1941. Eventually, several crucial changes were made to the design, greatly boosting the combat characteristics of the vehicle. By July 22, 1941, chassis and engine development was completed. According to some sources, in the fall of 1941, the vehicle was equipped with a serial KV turret and sent to the front.
U.S.S.R. Heavy Tank VII
IS-3
Mass production of the vehicle started in May 1945. On September 7,1945, IS-3 tanks took part in the Allied Victory Parade through Berlin. A total of 1170 vehicles were manufactured by the end of 1946, when production was canceled. From 1948 through the late 1950s, the tanks underwent a number of modernization refits.
U.S.S.R. Heavy Tank VIII
KV-4
The project of N. L. Dukhov developed in April 1941. A prototype was to be produced by November 1941. However, the work was discontinued due to the outbreak of the Soviet–German war.
U.S.S.R. Heavy Tank VIII
ST-I
The design was developed at Factory No. 92 by engineers V.A. Ganin and A.S. Chasovnikov. The new tank was intended as an upgraded version of the unsatisfactory heavy tanks of that time. Existed only in blueprints.
U.S.S.R. Heavy Tank IX
IS-8
Development started in 1949. The vehicle entered service in 1953 under the designation T-10. Subsequent development yielded several modifications of the tank, the most mass-produced being the T-10M. Approximately 2,500 vehicles were produced.
U.S.S.R. Heavy Tank IX
IS-4
The project was developed by the Design Bureau of the Chelyabinsk Kirov Plant starting in December 1943. In April 1944 two prototypes of the Object 701 were built. After prototype trials, the design was improved. In late 1944 and early 1945 two more prototypes underwent trials. The Object 701 No. 5 was recommended for adoption into service. However, production was called off in favor of the IS-3 just entering mass-production. After IS-3 production was suspended in 1946, production of the IS-4 began, continuing until 1949. A total of 25 IS-4M tanks were built in 1951. Later all previously produced tanks were modernized to the level of the IS-4M. According to different sources, between 235 and 258 vehicles were built in total; they were stationed in the Far East.
U.S.S.R. Heavy Tank X
IS-7
Development of the IS-7 started in the spring of 1945. Prototypes successfully underwent trials in 1946 and 1947. However, the IS-7 never saw mass production.
U.S.S.R. Heavy Tank X
MS-1
The first Soviet mass-produced tank with a total of 959 vehicles manufactured from 1928 through 1931.
U.S.S.R. Light Tank I
BT-2
Developed on the basis of the Christie tank M1931. Produced at the Kharkiv Komintern Locomotive Factory (KhPZ), with 650 BT-2 tanks and 1,884 BT-5 tanks manufactured from 1932 through 1935.
U.S.S.R. Light Tank II
T-26
A light tank developed on the basis of the U.K. Vickers Mk. E. tank at the beginning of the 1930s. The vehicle was designed for supporting infantry and came in several modifications. It also served as a basis for various special vehicles and SPGs that were not widely used. From 1931 through 1941, 9,686 vehicles of various modifications and configurations were produced.
U.S.S.R. Light Tank II
BT-7
The Soviet wheeled caterpillar tank used in the 1930s–1940s. The third vehicle in the series of the Soviet light BT tanks. The BT-7 differed from its predecessors in the welded hull of a modified shape and a new engine. A total of 5,556 vehicles of different variants were produced and saw action during the Khalkhyn Gol battles, Polish Campaign, Winter War and World War II.
U.S.S.R. Light Tank III
T-46
Developed under the program for improving the maneuverability of the T-26 light tank through redesigning its chassis to a wheeled caterpillar type. The prototype was built in 1935. The vehicle saw service on February 29, 1936 after a series of modifications. At least four vehicles from the experimental batch underwent trials in 1937, but the production was discontinued due to transmission faults and high cost. The manufactured vehicles were used during the Winter War and World War II.
U.S.S.R. Light Tank III
A-20
Development of the A-20 tank started at Kharkiv Factory No. 183 in December 1937. The project was a further development of the BT-7 tank and became a predecessor of the legendary T-34. Work on the vehicle was led by Mikhail Koshkin. On May 18, 1938, technical characteristics of the tank designated BT-20 were approved. Only a few experimental prototypes, with a wheeled caterpillar suspension, were built for training purposes.
U.S.S.R. Light Tank IV
MT-25
A proposed project of a light wheeled caterpillar vehicle. The draft was completed in February 1943. The most innovative feature was the suspension design. The suspension wheels were interleaved, and power was delivered to all wheels. No prototypes were manufactured.
U.S.S.R. Light Tank VI
LTTB
Development of the light tank project was started in early 1944 at Factory No. 174. The project was canceled during the design phase and the phase of setting tactical and technical requirements.
U.S.S.R. Light Tank VII
T-54 ltwt.
A proposed lightweight version of the T-54 medium tank. Development was started in May 1949. Compared to its series-produced predecessor, the tank had better performance and maneuverability. Therefore, the tank was planned to replace the T-54 in accomplishing complicated missions. However, the T-54 tank of 1949 was improved and mass produced, and the lightweight version was canceled while still in the design phase.
U.S.S.R. Light Tank VIII
T-28
The T-28 tank was developed by the Experimental Machine Design Bureau of the Voroshilov plant. The vehicle saw service on August 11, 1933. A total of 503 tanks were manufactured at the Leningrad Kirov Plant between 1933 and 1940. During mass production, the T-28 tank underwent a number of changes in design and modifications. The vehicles were used in the war with Finland in the winter of 1939–1940 and at the beginning of WWII.
U.S.S.R. Medium Tank IV
T-34
The legend of the Soviet armored forces and the most widely-produced Soviet tank of World War II, with a total of 33,805 vehicles manufactured. Three variants of this model were produced at several Soviet factories from 1940 through 1944.
U.S.S.R. Medium Tank V
T-34-85
Final modification of the T-34 tank of 1943. A new three-man gun turret allowed a more powerful 85-mm gun to be mounted. This greatly increased the combat effectiveness of the tank compared to its predecessor, the T-34-76. A total of more than 35,000, in several variants, were produced. Today the tank is still in service in several countries.
U.S.S.R. Medium Tank VI
T-43
Designed as a replacement for the T-34 in the spring of 1942. The T-43 was recommended for service, but all work on the project was discontinued in favor of improving the T-34. The vehicle never entered mass production.
U.S.S.R. Medium Tank VII
KV-13
Development was started in the fall of 1941, under the initiative of Semyon Ginsburg. After successful trials in the fall of 1942, the development of a second prototype was begun.
U.S.S.R. Medium Tank VII
T-44
Adopted in 1944, with a total of 965 vehicles produced by the end of the war. The T-44 remained in service until the end of the 1970s.
U.S.S.R. Medium Tank VIII
T-54
The first prototype was constructed at the end of 1944. After successful trials in 1945–1947 the T-54 mod. 1947 was adopted for service. 713 vehicles were constructed before production was phased out. In 1949 production of a new variant was launched.
U.S.S.R. Medium Tank IX
T-62A
Development of the first Soviet post-war medium tank started in 1951. In 1961, the T-62 tank with a smoothbore gun was deployed. At the same time a variant, the T-62A, with a rifled gun was also deployed. In March 1962, mass production of the T-62A was discontinued. The T-62 tank was mass-produced from 1961 through 1975, with a total of twenty thousand vehicles manufactured. Later modifications of the vehicle are still in service.
U.S.S.R. Medium Tank X
Object 140
An experimental medium tank. Developed between 1953 and 1958 in Nizhny Tagil to replace the T-54. Two prototypes were built, but in 1958 the project was terminated in favor of the Object 430.
U.S.S.R. Medium Tank X
T18
Development of this self-propelled gun on the basis of the M3 light tank started in October 1941. The first prototype passed trials in the spring of 1942, but the vehicle never saw mass production.
U.S.A. Tank Destroyer II
T82
The T82 tank destroyer was designed in November, 1943. The project was based on the chassis of the M5A1. The unroofed, lightly armored cabin contained the light 105 mm M3A1 howitzer. By 15 August, 1944, two prototypes of the T82 were produced; however, the project was closed on 21 June, 1945, due to the lack of interest from the army.
U.S.A. Tank Destroyer III
T40
Experimental tank destroyer developed on the basis of the M3 tank in the spring of 1942. The vehicle never entered mass production, nor saw service.
U.S.A. Tank Destroyer IV
M8A1
Developed in 1941 through 1942 on the basis of the M5 Stuart light tank. This SPG is an example of the successful use of an outdated chassis. The vehicle was equipped with a 75 mm short-barrel howitzer; however, attempts were made to fit a 75 mm tank gun into a modernized turret.
U.S.A. Tank Destroyer IV
M10 Wolverine
The most widely produced American tank destroyer, with a total of 6,406 vehicles manufactured from September 1942 through January 1943. More than a third of all Wolverines were supplied to Allied nations under Lend-Lease.
U.S.A. Tank Destroyer V
T67
A variant of the M41 light tank with an enlarged turret and 90-mm gun. Trials started on May 5, 1954. The trials were a success, but the tank never saw mass production due to lack of interest from the military authorities.
U.S.A. Tank Destroyer V
M36 Jackson
The most powerful American tank destroyer. The M36 was developed on the chassis of the M10A1 and M10, with a total of 2,324 vehicles manufactured from November 1943 through September 1945.
U.S.A. Tank Destroyer VI
M18 Hellcat
Development started in 1942. In April 1943 the General Motors company produced the first prototypes. One of a few American tank destroyers manufactured on its original chassis, not on a tank chassis. The tank destroyer became the fastest armored vehicle, of this type, of World War II. A total of 2,507 vehicles were produced from July 1943 through October 1944.
U.S.A. Tank Destroyer VI
T25 AT
The T25 was developed on the basis of the T23 medium tank, but was never manufactured.
U.S.A. Tank Destroyer VII
T25/2
Tank destroyer based on the T23. Development started in 1943. Since the T23 was not adopted for service, work on the tank destroyer was discontinued. Existed only in blueprints.
U.S.A. Tank Destroyer VII
T28
In March 1944, the U.S. Army placed an order for five prototypes of heavy vehicles designated T28. As a result, the T95 SPG was built.
U.S.A. Tank Destroyer VIII
T28 Prototype
Early prototype of a heavy tank designed for breaking through fortifications of the German Siegfried Line. Existed only in blueprints, prepared under the program for developing heavy vehicles that was initiated in September 1943.
U.S.A. Tank Destroyer VIII
T30
Experimental heavy tank. The vehicle was an early version of the T29 with enhanced armament. Two prototypes were built in 1945–1947 and underwent trials at the Aberdeen Proving Ground in 1948. Never entered mass production or saw service.
U.S.A. Tank Destroyer IX
T95
Development of this vehicle started in 1943, with 25 vehicles planned for production within a year. Two prototypes passed trials, but never saw action.
U.S.A. Tank Destroyer IX
T110E4
In 1954, a conference on future heavy tanks was held in Detroit. Alongside other advanced projects, the Chrysler Corporation suggested a new tank on the basis of the TS-31 project. The main goal was to make the tank fit the Bern national tunnel. Several variants were considered, but the project was canceled.
U.S.A. Tank Destroyer X
T110E3
In 1954, a conference on future heavy tanks was held in Detroit. Alongside other advanced projects, the Chrysler Corporation suggested a new tank on the basis of the TS-31 project. The main goal was to make the tank fit the Bern national tunnel. Several variants were considered, but the project was canceled.
U.S.A. Tank Destroyer X
T1 Heavy Tank
Development of the T1E2 started in the U.S.A. in May 1940. The vehicle was designed as a heavy tank. The distinctive features of the vehicle were a cast hull and hydromechanical transmission with a double-disc hydraulic converter. Later, the tank was designated M6. A total of 9 vehicles (1 of which was experimental) were produced. The tank never saw action.
U.S.A. Heavy Tank V
M6
Developed from 1940 through 1942, with a total of 40 vehicles manufactured from November 1942 through February 1944. It never saw action.
U.S.A. Heavy Tank VI
T29
Development of this experimental heavy tank started in 1944. The prototype was built in 1947. The vehicle featured the 105 mm T5E1 gun. After the war, the mass production of heavy tanks was deemed unreasonable, and only a few prototypes of this vehicle were built.
U.S.A. Heavy Tank VII
T32
An experimental World War II American heavy tank. Developed on the basis of the M26 Pershing and T29 tanks. Prototypes were built in 1946; however, the T32 never entered mass production.
U.S.A. Heavy Tank VIII
M103
The development started in 1948. In 1952 the order was placed for production of 300 vehicles to fight in the Korean War. The tank was designated as M103.
U.S.A. Heavy Tank IX
T110E5
Developed from 1952 as a heavy tank with more powerful armament, compared to the T-43 (M103). Restrictions were placed on the vehicle sizing as the tank was supposed to pass through the narrow tunnels of the Bernese Alps. Several designs were considered, but the project was canceled. No vehicles were ever manufactured.
U.S.A. Heavy Tank X
T57 Heavy Tank
A project for a heavy tank with an oscillating turret and automatic loader, developed from 1951. Experimental turrets for 120 mm and 155 mm guns were manufactured by 1957. However, the project was deemed unsuccessful and development was discontinued.
U.S.A. Heavy Tank X
T1 Cunningham
The experimental T1E1 light tank designed by the Cunningham company was a further development of the T1 tank. By April 1928, four vehicles were produced. After the vehicle underwent trials in November 1928, a decision was made to enhance the armor, which led to creating the subsequent modification designated the T1E2.
U.S.A. Light Tank I
M2 Light Tank
Development of the vehicle based on the M2A3 model was started in December 1938. The tank featured a new two-man turret with more powerful armament. A total of 365 vehicles were manufactured from May 1940 through March 1941. In April 1942, ten additional tanks were produced for training purposes. Some vehicles were supplied to the U.K. under Lend-Lease, others were deployed with the U.S. Marine Corps and saw combat in the Pacific Theater.
U.S.A. Light Tank II
M3 Stuart
Developed in 1938 through 1941 on the basis of the M2. Mass-produced from 1941. More than 13,000 vehicles in various versions were built, from the M3 to the M3A3, all of which were supplied to almost every allied nation under Lend-Lease. The M3 tanks were designated Stuart I by the British, while the M3A1 version received the designation Stuart III. The M3 first saw action in the battle at Sidi Rezegh.
U.S.A. Light Tank III
M5 Stuart
A further modification of the M3 Stuart, the M5 entered production in April 1942. By June 1944 a total of 8,884 vehicles in two variants had been produced. The tank was used in all theaters of war.
U.S.A. Light Tank IV
M24 Chaffee
The vehicle was intended as a replacement for the M3 Stuart. The M24 entered service in September 1943. They were produced at Massey-Harris and General Motors factories until July 1945, with a total of 4,731 vehicles manufactured.
U.S.A. Light Tank V
T21
A lightweight version of the T20 medium tank with the M7 elongated chassis. The vehicle was developed in the first half of 1943. Unlike the T20 tank, the T21 featured reduced armor and lightened armament. The vehicle never entered mass production nor saw service.
U.S.A. Light Tank VI
T37
The light tank T37 was developed by Detroit Arsenal in the late 1940s to replace the М24 Chaffee. An order was placed for three prototypes. Later, some technical innovations were applied in the development of the T41 and M41 tanks.
U.S.A. Light Tank VI
T71
Experimental airborne light tank with an oscillating turret and automatic loading. Developed by Detroit Arsenal from 1952 through 1953 as a replacement for M41. The armament was deemed ineffective, and the development was stopped after one wooden prototype had been built.
U.S.A. Light Tank VII
M41 Walker Bulldog
A further development of the T37 experimental tank. Underwent trials in 1949. In 1950, the contract for mass production was signed. The tank was produced by the Cadillac Motor Car Division, a division of General Motors.
U.S.A. Light Tank VII
T49
U.S.A. Light Tank VIII
T2 Medium Tank
Experimental medium tank. Developed from 1930 to 1932. However, this model never saw mass production.
U.S.A. Medium Tank II
M2 Medium Tank
The only medium tank to be adopted by the US Army during the interwar period. The vehicle was equipped with a 37 mm gun and six 7.62 mm machineguns, four of which were mounted on rotating fire units. The two non-rotating machineguns were placed on the front of the hull. Despite unimpressive combat characteristics, the M2A1 became a milestone for American tank development from the time of its inception by virtue of being easily adaptable for mass production. In 1940, 94 vehicles were produced.
U.S.A. Medium Tank III
M3 Lee
A WWII-era U.S. medium tank. The vehicle was named after the Confederate General of the U.S. Civil War, R. Lee. Also, widely recognized under its U.K. designation, M3 Grant, named after the General of the federal troops U. Grant. M3 was created in 1940 on the basis of the M2 tank, and saw mass production from June 1941 through December 1942. A total of 6,258 M3 tanks of various modifications were produced.
U.S.A. Medium Tank IV
M4 Sherman
The first production version of the Sherman, the most common American tank, with an amazing total of 49,234 vehicles manufactured. The Sherman first saw combat in North Africa.
U.S.A. Medium Tank V
M7
Development started in 1941. Initially, the vehicle was developed as a light tank; however, as the model gradually received extra armor and armaments, it was reclassified as a medium tank. Production of the M7 started by the fall of 1942. However, since the M7 was inferior to the mass-produced M4 Sherman in all parameters except speed and dimensions, the production was stopped. A total of 7 vehicles were produced.
U.S.A. Medium Tank V
M4A3E8 Sherman
Also known as M4А3(76)W HVSS. At the end of August 1944, a new bogie suspension was designed. The vehicle variant was mass-produced and saw battle beginning in late March 1945, with a total of 4542 vehicles of both suspension types manufactured.
U.S.A. Medium Tank VI
M4A3E2 Sherman Jumbo
The heavy-armored assault variant of the M4A3(75)W. The vehicle featured additional 38-mm armor plates, enhanced transmission compartment hatch, and a new turret with enhanced armor that was developed on the basis of the T23 turret.
U.S.A. Medium Tank VI
T20
The first in a series of 1942–1943 U.S. medium tank designs intended as replacements for the M4 Sherman. The first prototype was produced in May 1943, and trials went on until 1944. The vehicle was not approved for mass production, but subsequent prototypes, the T22 and T23, were created on the basis of this development. They, in turn, served as precursors of the T25 and T26. Eventually, the M26 Pershing emerged on their basis and was adopted for service.
U.S.A. Medium Tank VII
M26 Pershing
American medium tank, named in honor of General John Pershing, who led the American Expeditionary Force during World War I. In 1944–1946 in the U.S. Army, the M26 was temporarily classified as heavy tank. Starting in February 1945 these vehicles took part in World War II; in 1950–1951 the vehicle saw combat in the Korean War.
U.S.A. Medium Tank VIII
T69
A medium tank with an oscillating turret and automatic loading. Developed on the basis of experimental medium tank T42 in mid-50s. The vehicle never entered mass production.
U.S.A. Medium Tank VIII
M46 Patton
Developed in 1948 and 1949, the M46 Patton was a modernized and improved version of the M26 Pershing. A total of 1,168 M46 tanks, in two basic variants, were manufactured between 1949 and 1951. Pattons saw wide use in the Korean War.
U.S.A. Medium Tank IX
T54E1
A medium tank with an oscillating turret and automatic loading. Developed on the basis of the M48 tank in the mid-50s. Two prototypes were built. However, during trials automatic loading proved faulty and the development was discontinued in 1957.
U.S.A. Medium Tank IX
M48A1 Patton
The most successful American medium tank in the immediate post-war period. Development started in 1950. In April 1953, the vehicle entered service. A total of 11,703 vehicles of different variants were produced from 1952 through 1959.
U.S.A. Medium Tank X
Universal Carrier 2-pdr
The Universal Carrier was developed during the interwar period and was the main armored personnel carrier used by British Commonwealth forces. A total of 90,000 vehicles were produced from 1937 through 1945. Versions of the Universal Carriers were used for transporting personnel and equipment, as machine gun platforms, and for reconnaissance purposes. In 1940, a variant with a 40-mm anti-tank gun was developed.
U.K. Tank Destroyer II
Valentine AT
This experimental tank destroyer had the gun mounted in the middle of the hull behind a gun shield. A prototype was built, but work on the vehicle was discontinued when a new tank destroyer was developed, based on the Valentine and mounting the powerful 17-pounder.
U.K. Tank Destroyer III
Alecto
Tank destroyer, developed from 1944–1945 on the basis of the Tetrarch light tank. The project was canceled when WWII ended.
U.K. Tank Destroyer IV
AT 2
Design for an assault tank to break through enemy defensive lines. The design was completed by May 15th, 1943. No prototypes were built, the project helped set the stage for another heavy assault tank, the A39 Tortoise.
U.K. Tank Destroyer V
AT 8
The vehicle was conceived as a breakthrough tank. The design project evolved from the AT-7 project, and both projects were submitted at the same time. No prototypes were built because the A39 Tortoise was preferred.
U.K. Tank Destroyer VI
Churchill Gun Carrier
The vehicle was developed on the basis of the Churchill tank. The cabin with the 3-inch gun was placed in the front. Initially, 100 vehicles were ordered. Later, the order was reduced to 24 vehicles. Eventually, a total of 50 vehicles were manufactured from 1941 through 1942. However, they never saw action.
U.K. Tank Destroyer VI
AT 7
Conceived as an assault breakthrough tank, this design was completed by June 10th, 1943. No complete prototypes were built. However, some parts and components of the AT7 were used in the A39 Tortoise.
U.K. Tank Destroyer VII
AT 15
Assault tank conceived to break through fortified positions. The design project was ready by the fall of 1943, but no prototypes were manufactured. However, the project became the basis for the A39 Tortoise heavy assault tank.
U.K. Tank Destroyer VIII
Tortoise
The development of this assault tank began in Great Britain in 1942. The design was finalized by February 1944, and an order was placed for 25 vehicles. However, by the fall of 1947 only five tanks had been manufactured.
U.K. Tank Destroyer IX
FV215b (183)
Project for a heavy SPG based on the Conqueror Mk II tank with a 183 mm gun and rear placement of the traversable turret and fighting compartment. The vehicle was designed to counter Soviet heavy tanks at long range (up to 1,829 m) and should have been able to withstand return fire from 122 mm guns at a distance of up to 500 m. After the development of 193 mm Malkara anti-tank rockets—which were a cheaper and more efficient choice for countering the IS-series tanks—the vehicle lost its relevance. The project was canceled shortly after a dummy vehicle was built.
U.K. Tank Destroyer X
Churchill I
The A22 prototype was built by Vauxhall Motors in the fall of 1940. The vehicle first entered mass production in the summer of 1941. Early modifications had no track fenders, a different fan, and a 3-inch howitzer in the hull. A total of 300 Churchill I tanks were manufactured.
U.K. Heavy Tank V
Churchill VII
A modification of the A22 with enhanced armor. First vehicles of this type were produced just before the Allied landing in Normandy. This model was also the basis for the Churchill Crocodile flame-throwing tank.
U.K. Heavy Tank VI
Black Prince
Developed from 1943 through 1945 on the basis of the Churchill tank. It featured a wider and elongated hull to carry the upgraded turret with a 17-pounder gun. A total of six Black Prince prototypes were produced from 1944 through 1945. A few vehicles underwent trials but never saw action.
U.K. Heavy Tank VII
Caernarvon
Development of this infantry support tank started in 1944. The first prototype was ready for trials in 1952. A total of 21 tanks were manufactured but never entered service. Some of the vehicles were later converted into the Conqueror heavy tanks.
U.K. Heavy Tank VIII
Conqueror
Developed from 1949 through 1952, this tank was intended to confront new Soviet heavy tanks. A total of 185 vehicles were mass-produced from 1955 through 1959.
U.K. Heavy Tank IX
FV215b
Proposed plan for a heavy tank on the basis of the Conqueror Mk. II. Unlike the production model, this modification featured rear placement of the fighting compartment. No prototypes were manufactured.
U.K. Heavy Tank X
Cruiser Mk. I
The first cruiser tank in the British arsenal. Development was started in 1934 by Vickers. A total of 125 vehicles were mass-produced from 1936 through 1937.
U.K. Light Tank II
Cruiser Mk. III
The vehicle was developed on the basis of the M1931 Christie tanks, purchased by the British Army in 1936. The vehicle was intended to be a fast, lightly-armored breakthrough tank. The modified design was deemed successful and became the basis for other cruiser tanks. A total of 65 vehicles were built. They saw combat in France and North Africa in 1940–1941.
U.K. Light Tank II
Cruiser Mk. II
The A10 Cruiser Mk. II was a further development of the A9 modification designed by John Carden. The A10 had enhanced armor and no machinegun turrets. A prototype was built in July 1937 and adopted for service as a heavy cruiser tank. A total of 175 vehicles were ordered between 1938–1939, which were manufactured by September 1940. The vehicles saw combat in France (1940), Greece (1941) and North Africa (1941).
U.K. Light Tank III
Cruiser Mk. IV
An upgraded version of the cruiser tank Mk. III. The tank featured armor enhanced by the additional screens. The Cruiser Mk. IV fought in France in 1940 and in the early stages of the North African Campaign. This vehicle last saw action in the winter of 1941–1942. A total of 655 tanks were mass-produced.
U.K. Light Tank III
Valentine
Developed in 1938 by Vickers-Armstrong, the tank was one of the best in its class. A total of 8275 vehicles in various modifications were manufactured from 1940 through 1944.
U.K. Light Tank IV
Covenanter
A new cruiser tank that featured such innovations as an opposed-piston engine, front placement of cooling radiators, and the wide use of welding. The vehicle was ordered for production on April 17, 1939. A total of 1,771 tanks in four base variants were mass-produced. The Covenanter tanks were used mostly for training purposes in the U.K. from 1940 through 1943.
U.K. Light Tank IV
Crusader
The Crusader was developed by Nuffield Mechanizations Ltd. from 1938 through 1940. More than 5,300 vehicles were mass-produced from 1941 through 1943. They were most extensively used in the North African сampaign in 1941–1942.
U.K. Light Tank V
Vickers Medium Mk. I
The first British tank to carry the gun in a rotating turret. Vickers started development in 1922, and several dozen vehicles were produced from 1923 through 1925. Remained in service from 1924 through 1938.
U.K. Medium Tank I
Vickers Medium Mk. II
British medium tank. Developed on the basis of the Vickers Medium Mark I tank from 1924 through 1925 by Vickers. The vehicle was mass-produced from 1925 through 1934 with approximately 100 tanks manufactured.
U.K. Medium Tank II
Vickers Medium Mk. III
British medium tank also known as the Vickers "16-tonners". Three prototypes were produced by Vickers from 1926 through 1931. According to some sources, three more tanks were manufactured in 1933 and remained in service through 1938 but never saw action.
U.K. Medium Tank III
Matilda
Developed from 1936 through 1938. A total of 2987 vehicles were manufactured by August 1943. It was the only British tank to remain in service throughout World War II.
U.K. Medium Tank IV
Sherman V
The Sherman V (M4A4) is one of the modifications of the legendary Sherman, which was supplied to Great Britain by the USA. The tank features the Chrysler A57 Multibank engine made up of five car engines, and a turret with a pistol port on the left side and a radio set in the rear.
U.K. Medium Tank V
Sherman Firefly
A British version of the American M4 Sherman tank, developed in early 1944. It differed from the U.S. version by having a more powerful 17-pounder gun, different placement of the radio and ammunition, no bow gun, and no driver's assistant position. Between 2,100 and 2,300 vehicles of all modifications were built from 1944 through 1945.
U.K. Medium Tank VI
Cromwell
The Cromwell was developed in 1941–1942 by BRC&W. A total of 1,070 vehicles were mass-produced from late 1943 through 1945. They were extensively used by the British Army in the Northwest Europe Campaign of 1944–1945.
U.K. Medium Tank VI
Comet
A further development of the Cromwell cruiser tank, this British tank saw service in World War II. A total of 1,186 vehicles were manufactured from September 1944 through to late 1945.
U.K. Medium Tank VII
Centurion Mk. I
Development of the Centurion started in 1943. The vehicle was designed as a "universal tank" to replace existing infantry and cruiser tanks. The Centurion was the first British vehicle that featured sloped armor plates. The tank entered service in 1947. A total of 100 vehicles of this series were manufactured from 1945 through 1946.
U.K. Medium Tank VIII
Centurion Mk. 7/1
This upgraded version of the Centurion was developed by Leyland Motors and featured an expanded hull, improved cabin design, larger fuel tanks, and enhanced armor.
U.K. Medium Tank IX
FV4202
Experimental tank on the basis of the Centurion medium tank. The vehicle was in development from 1956 through 1959, but never saw mass production. Technical decisions and innovations implemented in the FV4202 became the basis for the FV4201 Chieftain.
U.K. Medium Tank X
Renault Otsu
Developed from 1925 through 1928 in France as an upgraded modification of the Renault FT. The modernization project was finished and the vehicle saw mass production. In 1929, a total of 10 vehicles were purchased by Japan and were designated the Otsu-Gata Sensha (Tank B Model). The Japanese vehicles were slightly modernized and were widely used both in action and for training purposes.
Japan Light Tank I
Type 95 Ha-Go
Japanese light tank also known as the Type 95. Developed from 1933 through 1935 as a cavalry support vehicle. However, the tank was often used to support infantry. The first prototype was built by Mitsubishi. The vehicle entered mass production in 1936, and a total of 2,378 vehicles were manufactured through 1943.
Japan Light Tank II
Type 98 Ke-Ni
A further modification of the Ha-Go developed by Hino Jidosha Kogyo. Despite the improved dynamic characteristics, the tank did not replace the Ha-Go. About 100 tanks were manufactured by Mitsubishi and Hino.
Japan Light Tank III
Type 5 Ke-Ho
By 1945 the design of the Type 95 Ha-Go was already obsolete. In 1942 the Hino Jidosha company started to develop a new tank. A prototype designated the Type 5 Ke-Ho was built in 1944. The design of the tank was similar to that of the Czech LT vz.38 and the Japanese Chi-Ha. However, the vehicle did not go into mass production.
Japan Light Tank IV
Chi-Ni
Developed by Osaka Artillery Arsenal as a replacement for the Type 2589. The Chi-Ni and the Chi-Ha underwent combined trials in 1937. The Chi-Ha was deemed more successful. One prototype was manufactured.
Japan Medium Tank II
Type 97 Chi-Ha
Developed by Mitsubishi from 1935 through 1937. The vehicle was mass-produced from 1938 through 1942, alongside an upgraded Shinhoto Chi-Ha from 1941 through 1942. A total of 1,220 vehicles of both types were manufactured. The Chi-Ha and the Shinhoto Chi-Ha tanks were widely used by Japanese forces in China, the Pacific Theater, and the Kuril Islands. After the surrender of Japan, these vehicles were used by both PLA and Kuomintang forces in the Chinese Civil War from 1946 through 1949.
Japan Medium Tank III
Type 1 Chi-He
The Type 1 Chi-He medium tank was a further development of the Type 97 Chi-Ha. It was developed in 1941, but due to the lack of steel, production did not start until 1943. A total of 170 tanks were manufactured. Most of them were held for the defense of Japan and never saw combat.
Japan Medium Tank IV
Type 3 Chi-Nu
The Type 3 Chi-Nu medium tank is a modification of the Тype 1 Chi-He with a new turret and gun. The tank was the most powerful among wartime Japanese mass-produced vehicles. However, only 60 vehicles were manufactured due to shortages of components and materials.
Japan Medium Tank V
Type 4 Chi-To
The Type 4 Chi-To medium tank was developed in 1943 on the basis of the Chi-Nu. The tank was conceived to replace the Chi-Ha. However, mass production was not launched due to shortages of materials and components. A total of six chassis were produced, and only two tanks were built on their basis.
Japan Medium Tank VI
Type 5 Chi-Ri
A single prototype was manufactured at the beginning of 1945. The vehicle underwent trials and was recommended for service. However, Japan was defeated before mass production could begin. After the surrender, the prototype was confiscated by American occupation authorities and was shipped to the United States.
Japan Medium Tank VII
STA-1
The first Japanese post-war tank was developed on the basis of U.S. vehicles. The STA-1 was developed, taking into consideration Japanese terrain, rail network specifications, and anthropometric data of Japanese tankers. Only one prototype was built, in December 1956.
Japan Medium Tank VIII
Type 61
The first tank developed in Japan after WWII. It was developed from 1954 through 1961 on the basis of the American M47 tank. The dimensions of the vehicle were decreased and the armor was reduced. As a result, the weight of the tank was lighter, and the tank complied with the requirements of the Japanese armed forces.
Japan Medium Tank IX
STB-1
In the early 1960s, Mitsubishi started development of a new tank that complied with government requirements for armament and defense. The first two prototypes of the STB-1 were manufactured in September 1969 for trials. In 1970 the prototypes were shown to journalists and participated in a military parade.
Japan Medium Tank X
Panzerjäger I
Development of the Panzerjäger I, the German tank destroyer, started in 1939 based on the Panzerkampfwagen I Ausf. B. Initially, the 37-mm Pak 36 gun was mounted on the chassis of the Panzerkampfwagen I Ausf. B. However, during the invasion of Poland, it was revealed that the gun was not effective against new vehicles. After Germany captured Czechoslovakia in 1940, the 47-mm Pak 36(t) L/43.4 (Škoda 47-mm A-5 KP ÚV vz. 38 Model A5) gun was mounted on the tank destroyer. A total of 202 vehicles were manufactured and saw action until 1943.
Germany Tank Destroyer II
Marder II
Light tank destroyer developed in early 1942 based on the chassis of the outdated, but massively produced, Pz.Kpfw. II, and fitted with a powerful gun. The vehicle saw wide use on the Eastern Front; from 1944, it also fought in Italy and on the Western Front. The tank destroyer was in service until the end of the war.
Germany Tank Destroyer III
Hetzer
In 1943, the Wehrmacht were experiencing a dire shortage of StuG III tank destroyers because the joint U.S.A.-U.K. air raids caused considerable damage to the Alkett company's factory that produced these vehicles. December 1943, a decision was made to utilize the working capacities of the BMM company in Prague to start production of tank destroyers. Components of the Pz.Kpfw. 38(t) tank were widely used in the new vehicle. The first prototypes were produced in March 1944. More than 2,800 vehicles were built by May 1945.
Germany Tank Destroyer IV
StuG III Ausf. G
Originally designed as an assault vehicle, this self-propelled gun was converted into a tank destroyer beginning with the F series. A total of 9,265 vehicles of this series and 1,211 of the Stu.H. 42 were produced.
Germany Tank Destroyer V
Pz.Sfl. IVc
Proposed antiaircraft vehicle mounting the 88-mm antiaircraft gun. Development started in Germany in 1941. The vehicle was based on the Pz.Sfl.IVc chassis. The operational requirements for the vehicle were constantly changed, and the FlaK 41 gun was mounted on the chassis only in 1944. The vehicle was to be the basis of variants with other armament alternatives. However, the plan was never implemented. Only three prototypes were manufactured.
Germany Tank Destroyer V
Jagdpanzer IV
The Pz. IV medium tank served as the basis for many vehicles, including tank destroyers. At the end of 1944, a version of the 75-mm PaK 42 L/70 gun was prepared for this basis. The new variant of the vehicle was designated the JagdPzIV/70. From August 1944 through March 1945, the Nibelungenwerke company produced 278 vehicles of this type.
Germany Tank Destroyer VI
Nashorn
The official designation of the Nashorn ("Rhinoceros") tank destroyer was 8.8 cm PaK 43/1 auf Geschützwagen III/IV (Sf). The vehicle was designated the Hornisse ("Hornet") until 1944. Produced on the same chassis as the Hummel heavy SPG. The vehicle first saw combat on the Eastern Front in the summer of 1943. A total of 494 vehicles were manufactured.
Germany Tank Destroyer VI
Jagdpanther
Development of this tank destroyer, based on the chassis of the new VK 30.02 (MAN) tank, began in 1942. In October 1943, the prototype trials were started. A total of 392 vehicles were manufactured.
Germany Tank Destroyer VII
Sturer Emil
Experimental tank destroyer developed on the basis of the VK 30.01(H) heavy tank. Only two vehicles were manufactured. They fought on the Eastern Front. The tank destroyer was designated as “Sturer Emil” (German for “Stubborn Emil”) due to frequent breakdowns.
Germany Tank Destroyer VII
Ferdinand
Developed on the basis of the Porsche Tiger, with a total of 90 vehicles produced in April and May 1943. They first saw combat in the Battle of Kursk (Operation Citadel).
Germany Tank Destroyer VIII
Jagdpanther II
Developed on the basis of the Panther II. The vehicle was to be equipped with a 128 mm gun and the fighting compartment to be located in the rear. Existed only in blueprints.
Germany Tank Destroyer VIII
Rhm.-Borsig Waffenträger
Developed by the Rheinmetall-Borsig company and designed as a special artillery carrier. The vehicle was designed to carry an artillery system as well as to fire from the chassis. The vehicle utilized the suspension of the Hetzer tank destroyer. Development continued from the end of 1942 through to the middle of 1944. However, the project was discontinued in favor of the Ardelt project because of a complicated design, high cost, and excessive weight.
Germany Tank Destroyer VIII
Jagdtiger
Developed from 1942 through 1944, the heavy tank destroyer, with the chassis of the Tiger II heavy tank, became the heaviest mass-produced armored vehicle ever. According to various sources, 70–79 tank destroyers were manufactured from 1944 through 1945. The vehicles saw service in the 653rd and 512th Heavy Panzerjäger Battalions.
Germany Tank Destroyer IX
Waffenträger auf Pz. IV
Tank destroyer developed in February 1944 on the basis of the PzIV tank. Development was discontinued in favor of a similar vehicle on the basis of the Krupp Waffentrager 12.8 cm PaK 44 of Czech origin. Existed only in blueprints.
Germany Tank Destroyer IX
Jagdpanzer E 100
The E 100 was conceived as the basis for a self-propelled gun, an antiaircraft vehicle, and a tank destroyer. However, development was never started.
Germany Tank Destroyer X
Grille 15
In the summer of 1942, Waffenamt (the German Army Weapon Agency) concluded an agreement with the Krupp and Rheinmetall companies for designing a tank destroyer on the chassis of the Panther tank. It was planned to mount either the 128-mm K 43 gun or the 150-mm sFH 43 howitzer. The projects were designated Grille 12 and Grille 15, featured rear placement of the fighting compartment, and differed only in the artillery system type. Later, the Grille 15 received a 150-mm gun with a length of 63 calibers, which could penetrate 200 mm of armor at 4,000 meters. However, development was slow, and the Grille 15 remained only in blueprints.
Germany Tank Destroyer X
Durchbruchswagen 2
Prototype of a heavy tank, developed by the Henschel und Sohn company. The prototype was built in 1938. In September 1939 the VK 30.01 project was preferred, and the DW program was canceled. However, the DW I and DW II prototypes were used for various trials until 1941.
Germany Heavy Tank IV
VK 30.01 (H)
An order for developing the vehicle was placed on September 9, 1939. Over the course of its development, Henschel engineers actively used elements of the D.W. II project. The first two prototypes were ready in March 1942; another two were built by October the same year. Hulls of the prototypes underwent trials at the plant proving ground. After the trials, two prototypes were converted into heavy tank destoyers. Six turrets manufactured by the Krupp company were placed at the Atlantic Wall.
Germany Heavy Tank V
VK 36.01 (H)
An experimental German WWII heavy tank developed by Henschel. The vehicle was a further development of the VK 30.01 (H) project and a stage in the design process for the Tiger. A total of eight chassis and one prototype were built in 1942. During the development, various technical solutions were trialed. Some of them later served as a basis for German heavy tank designs during the WWII. The chassis was also used in armored recovery vehicles.
Germany Heavy Tank VI
Tiger I
Development of the Tiger I was started in 1937 by the Henschel company. Mass production began in 1942, with an eventual total of 1,354 vehicles manufactured. The tank first saw combat in the fighting for Leningrad, and Tigers were at the forefront of battles from Tunisia to Kursk. Although production was discontinued in the summer of 1944, the Tiger I continued to see action until the end of the war.
Germany Heavy Tank VII
Tiger (P)
On May 26, 1941, Adolf Hitler ordered Ferdinand Porsche and the Henschel company to develop prototypes of a new heavy tank. The prototypes were shown to the Führer on April 20, 1942. Manufacturing began, but the production run was cut short due to the complexity of the tank's drive and control systems, and a shortage of the required copper. Later, 90 produced hulls were converted into Ferdinand tank destroyers.
Germany Heavy Tank VII
Tiger II
The most heavily armored tank carrying the most powerful anti-tank gun. The vehicle's drawbacks included an overloaded suspension and engine-transmission group, as well as excessive general mass. When engaging enemy vehicles at long range, the Tiger II had an upper hand over any other vehicle in terms of the gun and armor protection. However, due to the excessive mass of the vehicle, relatively low durability of the engine and transmission, and small total number of vehicles built, the Tiger II did not have any significant impact on the course of war.
Germany Heavy Tank VIII
VK 45.02 (P) Ausf. A
Development of this vehicle started in April 1942. The Krupp company received an order for construction of turrets. However, the prototype was never manufactured. The turrets were mounted on the first Tiger IIs.
Germany Heavy Tank VIII
VK 45.02 (P) Ausf. B
Two designs of this vehicle (one with the forward-mounted turret and the other with the rear-mounted turret) were drawn up by Ferdinand Porsche. The tank never saw mass production.
Germany Heavy Tank IX
E 75
In 1945 the E 75 was conceived as a standard heavy tank of the Panzerwaffe to replace the Tiger II. It existed only in blueprints.
Germany Heavy Tank IX
Maus
Developed from June 1942 through July 1944, with two prototypes produced, only one of which received a turret and armament.
Germany Heavy Tank X
E 100
In June 1943, the Adlerwerke company received an order for development of the E 100. However, in 1944, heavy tank development was discontinued. By the end of the war, only the chassis was completed, which was later captured by the British Army.
Germany Heavy Tank X
Leichttraktor
Produced from 1930 to 1934. Four prototypes with different armament, crew, weight, and suspension features were manufactured.
Germany Light Tank I
Pz.Kpfw. 35 (t)
Developed by Škoda in 1935, the vehicle saw service in the Czechoslovakian army under the designation LT vz. 35. During the occupation of Czechoslovakia, the captured tanks were redesignated as Pz.Kpfw. 35 (t) and deployed with the Wehrmacht. The vehicles were actively used by the 1st Light Division (the 6th Panzer Division after reorganization) until the late 1941. A total of 434 tanks were manufactured.
Germany Light Tank II
Pz.Kpfw. II
The last modification of the light Pz. II tank. The vehicle featured enhanced armor, the 2 cm KwK 38 gun and improved observation devices. A total of 524 vehicles were built from March 1941 through December 1942.
Germany Light Tank II
Pz.Kpfw. 38 (t)
Developed by the ČKD company for the Czechoslovakian Army in 1938. During the German occupation, the vehicle saw service in the Wehrmacht and was used in the Polish and French Campaigns, as well as on the Eastern Front. The tank saw combat on the front line until the middle of 1942. Approximately 1,400 vehicles in eight modifications (Ausf. A/B/C/D/E/F/S/G) were manufactured.
Germany Light Tank III
Pz.Kpfw. III Ausf. A
An order for designing a 15-ton tracked vehicle with a gun armament was placed in 1935. Despite the weight of the Pz. Kpfw. III Ausf. E, the first large-scale vehicle, reached 19.5 tons, its configuration was deemed successful, and the number of vehicles eventually grew to 96. Further modifications became even more popular, and the Pz. Kpfw. III became the most mass-produced vehicle of the Wehrmacht.
Germany Light Tank III
Pz.Kpfw. II Ausf. G
The German WWII light reconnaissance tank was a modification of the Pz. II tank. The vehicle featured an improved hull and suspension, a more powerful engine, and observation devices for the radio operator and driver, which increased the view range.
Germany Light Tank III
Pz.Kpfw. II Luchs
As compared to the Pz.Kpfw. II Ausf. C, the vehicle featured a new hull and turret, as well as a chassis with a staggered arrangement of roadwheels. The reconnaissance tank had strong characteristics, but only 131 vehicles of the L modification were built, after manufacture proved to be too expensive.
Germany Light Tank IV
Pz.Kpfw. 38 (t) n.A.
Developed by the BMM company as a new light reconnaissance tank on the chassis of the Pz.Kpfw. 38 (t) from July 1940. The vehicle used welding technology instead of rivets. The new engine and improved transmission allowed for a top speed of 64 km/h. Development was discontinued in favor of the VK 1303. Five prototypes were manufactured.
Germany Light Tank IV
VK 16.02 Leopard
The design of the VK 16.02, known as the Leopard, was based on the Panzer II Ausf. J (VK 16.01) and Panzer II Ausf. M (VK 13.01) that had been developed earlier. A dummy vehicle was ready in May–June 1942, and the first prototype was built by September 1, 1942. According to "Panzerprogramm 41", that provided for the manufacturing of 339 vehicles (105 by December 1943 and 150 by the middle of 1944), mass production was to be launched in April 1943 but never started. Later, the Leopard turret was mounted on the Sd.Kfz.234/2 designated as Puma.
Germany Light Tank V
VK 28.01
The vehicle was intended as a standard light tank of the Panzerwaffe and a basis for antiaircraft tanks and vehicles able to ride on any terrain and railroad tracks. Existed only in blueprints.
Germany Light Tank VI
Spähpanzer SP I C
The reconnaissance tank destroyer was being developed by Hotchkiss and Klöckner-Humboldt-Deutz companies from 1956 through 1962 in order to increase the anti-tank capability of recon tank battalions. A 90-mm anti-tank gun was planned to be mounted on the new vehicle. The project was eventually declined. The number of prototypes built is unknown.
Germany Light Tank VII
Spähpanzer Ru 251
The vehicle was developed on the basis of the Kanonenjagdpanzer 4-5 tank destroyer by the Henschel company in 1964. The tank was planned to replace the obsolete M41 Walker Bulldog vehicles used by the reconnaissance battalions of the armored divisions in the German Army. The tank never saw mass production, but some technical innovations were applied later in the development of other vehicles. The total number of prototypes built is unknown.
Germany Light Tank VIII
Pz.Kpfw. IV Ausf. A
Development of the vehicle started in 1935. It was nicknamed Pz Kpfw IV in April 1936. Mass production began in the fall of 1937, and the first vehicles saw service starting in 1938. A total of 35 vehicles were manufactured and were in service until 1941.
Germany Medium Tank III
Pz.Kpfw. III
Production of the J variant started in March 1941. In addition to the enhanced armor, the vehicle received the new 50-mm KwK 38 gun, which was deemed extremely successful; 1,067 other vehicles featured the KwK 39 gun, the improved version with better penetration rate. An attempt to mount a 75-mm gun (the N variant) was recognized as a failure, and the most large-scale vehicles were the J, L, and M variants (with 50-mm guns that had an impeccable track record). A total of 5,691 vehicles were produced, among which 1,969 were equipped with long-barrel guns and 2,391 with short-barrel 50-mm guns.
Germany Medium Tank IV
Pz.Kpfw. IV Ausf. D
This modification of the Pz IV was developed in October 1939. The vehicle had enhanced armor and an improved, external gun mantlet. The tank was mass-produced until May 1940, with a total of 229 vehicles manufactured.
Germany Medium Tank IV
Pz.Kpfw. IV
Produced in greater numbers than any other tank of the Panzerwaffe. Manufactured from October 1937 through March 1945, with a total production of 8,519 tanks plus command vehicles. Beginning in May 1942 this tank was equipped with a long-barreled gun.
Germany Medium Tank V
Pz.Kpfw. III/IV
A project for the new vehicle with sloped armor plates and components of the Pz.Kpfw. III and Pz.Kpfw. IV was approved on January 4, 1944. In March 1944, a contract for three prototypes was signed, but the program was discontinued on July 12. Only a tank destroyer on a similar base saw mass production.
Germany Medium Tank V
VK 30.01 (P)
The Porsche company developed the concept of a new vehicle in 1939. On March 5, 1941, after numerous approvals, the company prepared blueprints and, in July 1941, produced the hull from mild steel. The hull and chassis (with detachable equipment for trenching) passed performance trials. One wooden prototype of the turret and one wooden prototype of the hull were manufactured. In 1942, the project was discontinued in favor of new heavy tanks.
Germany Medium Tank VI
VK 30.01 (D)
In the winter of 1941–1942 the WaPrüf 6 issued technical requirements for a new 30-ton tank. The orders for development were placed with MAN and Daimler-Benz. The prototypes were to be ready by May 1942. However, on May 13th, 1942 only comparative characteristics of the projects were submitted. The MAN's project was preferred, and the Daimler-Benz's project was canceled.
Germany Medium Tank VI
VK 30.02 (M)
A medium tank, developed by the MAN company and designed as a 30-ton tank. Simultaneously, the Daimler-Benz company developed a competing project. On May 13, 1942, the two projects were submitted to the Ministry of Armaments and War Production. The MAN design was preferred, and the tank eventually entered service as the Pz.Kpfw. V Panther.
Germany Medium Tank VI
Panther I
This famous tank was produced from January 1943 through April 1945, with a total of 5,796 vehicles built plus eight vehicles built on the F series chassis.
Germany Medium Tank VII
VK 30.02 (D)
Developed as a response to, and influenced by, the Soviet T-34. The initial order for the production of 200 vehicles was canceled in favor of the Panther.
Germany Medium Tank VII
Panther II
The vehicle was conceived in 1943. Two prototypes with the existing Panther I turrets were ordered in 1944. By 1945 only one of them had been built by the MAN company.
Germany Medium Tank VIII
Indien-Panzer
The project was developed as a medium tank for the Indian Army. The work on the project was carried out by Porsche, Daimler-Benz, and Zahnradfabrik AG of Friedrichshafen. However, the vehicle was deemed to be too complicated for production in India, and the project was canceled.
Germany Medium Tank VIII
E 50
In 1945 the E 50 was conceived as a standard medium tank of the Panzerwaffe to replace the Panther and Panther II. It existed only in blueprints.
Germany Medium Tank IX
Leopard Prototyp A
Prototype developed from 1960 through 1961 as a medium tank for the Bundeswehr, with a total of 26 prototypes manufactured. The prototypes were tested up to 1963. The vehicle was the predecessor of the Leopard medium tank.
Germany Medium Tank IX
E 50 Ausf. M
The German Army demanded that the E-series tanks had transmissions positioned in the rear. However, the E 50 and E 75 tanks used the Tiger II engine-transmission compartment, which made rear placement of the transmission impossible. The E 50 Ausf. M tank was a redesign of the E 50 project with the transmission placed in the rear.
Germany Medium Tank X
Leopard 1
Main battle tank of the Federal Republic of Germany. Development was started in 1956. The first prototypes were built in 1965 at the Krauss-Maffei factory. The Leopard 1 saw service in the armies of more than 10 countries.
Germany Medium Tank X
Renault FT AC
As the French Army's vast fleet of Renault FT tanks passed into obsolence, some efforts were made to upgrade the vehicles. One proposal was to convert them into tank destroyers, but the plan was never implemented.
France Tank Destroyer II
Renault UE 57
Developed in 1943 in Great Britain by mounting the British 6-pounder gun on the chassis of the French tankette UE2. One prototype was manufactured.
France Tank Destroyer III
Somua SAu 40
A proposed tank destroyer on the basis of the Somua S35. Existed only in blueprints.
France Tank Destroyer IV
S35 CA
The design called for the conversion of tanks into tank destroyers by mounting a 17-pounder gun into an open-topped, lightly armored cabin.
France Tank Destroyer V
ARL V39
A prototype of the ARL 40. The vehicle was intended as an assault SPG. Mass production was to be launched in 1940 but never started due to the occupation of France.
France Tank Destroyer VI
AMX AC mle. 46
Proposed plan for a heavy tank destroyer on the basis of the M4. Development was started in 1946. The configuration of the vehicle had a strong resemblance to the Jagdpanther. Existed only in blueprints.
France Tank Destroyer VII
AMX AC mle. 48
A draft project of a heavy tank destroyer, developed in 1947–1948 under the influence of the Jagdpanther. The vehicle was to feature a 120 mm gun as the main armament. The distinctive feature of the vehicle was three 20 mm MG 151/20 machineguns, mounted on top of the fighting compartment and rear. Existed only in blueprints.
France Tank Destroyer VIII
AMX 50 Foch
From the late 1940s to the early 1950s, France was developing heavy tank destroyers. This project was developed under the influence of German tank destroyers of WWII. The vehicle featured a 120-mm gun. At least one prototype was built, which took part in the military parade in Paris on July 14, 1950. Never saw mass production.
France Tank Destroyer IX
AMX 50 Foch (155)
In 1952, with the launch of the AMX 50 120 tank project, the French discontinued development of the AMX 50 Foch tank destroyer. A tank destroyer having the same 120-mm gun armament as the tank was thought to be unnecessary. There were attempts to upgrade the main gun to 155 mm, but these efforts were abandoned as France made moves to adopt standardized NATO equipment.
France Tank Destroyer X
B1
Development was started in 1921. Due to extended trials the vehicle did not enter service until 1934. A total of 403 tanks in two basic modifications were manufactured from 1935 through 1940.
France Heavy Tank IV
BDR G1 B
The project of a new vehicle was suggested by engineers of the Baudet-Donon-Rousell company in June 1938. However, the design was never developed.
France Heavy Tank V
ARL 44
Development of the vehicle started while France was still occupied by the German forces. It was an attempt to use the obsolete B1 Bis chassis and fit it with a modern, more powerful gun. The project was finished by the Atelier de Construction de Rueil Design Bureau. A total of 60 vehicles were manufactured. However, the tank was considered unsuccessful compared to similar foreign vehicles.
France Heavy Tank VI
AMX M4 mle. 45
Development of this heavy tank started in 1945. The vehicle incorporated several design features of the Pz.Kpfw. VI Ausf. B Tiger II tank. The vehicle existed only in blueprints. Later the AMX M4 (1945) became a prototype for the AMX 50 100.
France Heavy Tank VII
AMX 50 100
The AMX 50 100 heavy tank was a further development of the M4 project. The first prototype was built in 1949. The 55-ton vehicle featured a 100-mm gun in the oscillating turret. The prototype was tested with gasoline and diesel engines from 1950 through 1952. The vehicle never entered mass production nor saw service.
France Heavy Tank VIII
AMX 50 120
A prototype of the AMX 50 tank. Developed in the early 1950s under the influence of the Soviet IS-3 and T-10. The tank featured enhanced armor and a 120-mm gun in the oscillating turret.
France Heavy Tank IX
AMX 50 B
Developed starting in 1951 by DEFA, the state weapons design bureau. By 1958, the AMX 50 B received a number of improvements, including a low-profile cast hull and torsion-bar suspension. A new oscillating turret with a 120-mm gun was also mounted on the vehicle. Despite the fact that the Maybach engine power provided just 1,000 h.p., specialists from the German Gruppe M company were looking for a solution that would allow the vehicle to reach a speed of up to 65 km/h. Only one finished prototype of this variant was built.
France Heavy Tank X
Renault FT
The vehicle entered service in 1917, with 3,177 vehicles manufactured by the end of World War I and 3,800 vehicles produced in total. At the beginning of World War II, a total of 1,560 vehicles were in service.
France Light Tank I
D1
Development was started in 1929. Mass production was launched in 1930, with 160 vehicles manufactured by 1935. A total of 152 tanks fought in France. Eighteen vehicles were captured by the German Army and used for training purposes.
France Light Tank II
Renault R35
The most massively produced WWII French light tank. Developed in 1934 on a request from the army for infantry support. A total of 1,630 vehicles were manufactured from 1936 through 1940.
France Light Tank II
AMX 38
Developed in 1937 by the AMX company on the basis of the Renault R-40. The vehicle had a larger turret than comparable vehicles and was equipped with a diesel engine. By 1940 two vehicles were ready for trials.
France Light Tank III
AMX ELC bis
Developed from 1957 through 1961 to provide French airborne troops with an air-transportable vehicle that could engage heavy tanks. The vehicle mounted a 90-mm gun and had a very low silhouette. The two crew members were seated in the turret, which could turn through 360 degrees, but only when the vehicle was not moving. Variants with different guns were planned. Only one prototype was manufactured. The vehicle never saw service.
France Light Tank V
AMX 12 t
This design of a light high-speed tank was developed in 1946. The vehicle was never actually produced, but became the basis for the well-known AMX 13.
France Light Tank VI
AMX 13 75
Maneuverable light tank with an oscillating turret and a 75 mm autoloader gun that could fire up to 10 shots per minute. At that time, the gun on this vehicle had superior penetration compared to the guns of most other medium tanks.
France Light Tank VII
AMX 13 90
In the early 1960s, the 75-mm gun with a muzzle velocity of 1,000 m/s was deemed outdated. The vehicle received the new 90-mm F3 gun that used more powerful HEAT shells. This modernization did not require any significant changes to the turret or vehicle design. The first vehicles were manufactured in February, 1967. The existing vehicles underwent the gun modernization as well.
France Light Tank VIII
Bat.-Châtillon 25 t AP
In 1950–1951, engineers of the FAMH company (Compagnie des forges et aciéries de la marine et d'Homécourt) worked on the development of a medium tank with a 90-mm gun and a rotating turret. Work was discontinued at the preliminary design stage. Later, all elements of the vehicle were incorporated in the Batignolles-Châtillon 25 t tank.
France Light Tank IX
Bat.-Châtillon 25 t
This experimental tank was a further development of the AMX 13. The tank underwent trials but never entered mass production nor saw service. Two vehicles were manufactured.
France Light Tank X
D2
A further modification of the D1 tank. Developed in 1934 by the Renault company. A total of 100 vehicles were manufactured from 1936 through 1940. The vehicles of the second series were designated as D2bis.
France Medium Tank III
AMX 40
Development was started in March 1940. Initially, the vehicle was to have a wheeled caterpillar propulsion system. The blueprint of the vehicle was created but in July 1940 work was discontinued.
France Medium Tank IV
NationAmountPercentage
U.S.S.R. 23
26%
U.S.A. 15
17%
U.K. 8
9%
Hybrid nation 10
11%
Japan 5
6%
Germany 21
24%
France 3
3%
China 3
3%
TypeAmountPercentage
Tank Destroyer 16
18%
Heavy Tank 25
28%
Light Tank 16
18%
Medium Tank 31
35%
TierAmountPercentage
II 4
5%
III 12
14%
IV 5
6%
V 15
17%
VI 10
11%
VII 20
23%
VIII 20
23%
IX 1
1%
X 1
1%
Tank Nation Type Tier
SU-76I
Developed on the basis of captured German StuG III and Pz.Kpfw. III vehicles in 1943 at Sverdlovsk plant No. 37. A total of 200 vehicles were manufactured.
U.S.S.R. Tank Destroyer III
SU-85I
A proposed modification of captured German Pz.Kpfw. III tanks, which were to be mounted with the 85 mm gun. Never entered mass production nor saw service.
U.S.S.R. Tank Destroyer V
SU-100Y
Developed on the basis of the T-100 heavy tank. The vehicle was intended to neutralize fortified emplacements and enemy vehicles, and was equipped with the improved B-13-S2 naval gun. The only prototype was manufactured in March 1940. The vehicle never entered mass production.
U.S.S.R. Tank Destroyer VI
SU-122-44
Development was started in June 1944 by the Uralmash Design Bureau. The vehicle was based on the T-44 chassis and had a conventional configuration, with the front placement of the fighting compartment. In October, People's Commissariat of the Tank Industry considered the SU-122-44 project. In December the design project was ready. However, the SU-100M-2 with the rear placement of the fighting compartment was preferred.
U.S.S.R. Tank Destroyer VII
ISU-122S
A heavy assault gun, built on the basis of the IS tank, was effective against German heavy tanks as well as fortifications. The prototype was built at the Chelyabinsk Kirov Plant in April 1944. The vehicle entered service in August of that year, and a total of 675 vehicles were manufactured in 1944 and 1945.
U.S.S.R. Tank Destroyer VII
KV-220 Beta-Test
Development of KV-220 on the basis of the KV heavy tank started in the summer of 1940. A prototype was built on December 5. Unlike other KV modifications, the tank featured an elongated hull, additional support roller, enhanced armor (100 mm), and a new turret with the 85 mm F-30 gun. In the fall of 1941, production of the KV-1 was discontinued. The vehicle received the mass-produced KV turret and was sent to the frontlines.
U.S.S.R. Heavy Tank V
Churchill III
A British tank supplied to the U.S.S.R. under Lend-Lease. The U.S.S.R. received a total of 301 vehicles, with some lost at sea during transport to Murmansk.
U.S.S.R. Heavy Tank V
IS-6
Plans for this vehicle were drawn up in the construction bureau of the Chelyabinsk Kirov plant from December 1943 to the summer of 1944. Further development and the construction of the first prototype took place at the Uralmash plant. However, the vehicle had no advantages over the other heavy tank designs under consideration, and its armor was seen as inferior to the IS-4 (Object 701), so the IS-6 was not selected for production.
U.S.S.R. Heavy Tank VIII
KV-5
Development began in June 1941 at the Leningrad Kirov Plant and was completed by August, but plans were interrupted due to the complicated situation on the front. The KV-5 was to utilize some components of the KV-1. A new turret was designed, incorporating the 107-mm ZIS-6 gun. Two roadwheels and a single support roller were to be added on each side. A new 1,200 h.p. diesel engine was being developed for the vehicle, however it was not completed in time and was replaced with two V-2K engines.
U.S.S.R. Heavy Tank VIII
IS-5 (Object 730)
The development of the vehicle was started in 1949 by the Design Bureau of the Chelyabinsk Kirov Plant under the supervision of Joseph Kotin. In 1950 a preproduction batch of 10 vehicles was launched. After the vehicle underwent all trials and received upgrades, it was adopted for service in 1953 under the designation IS-8.
U.S.S.R. Heavy Tank VIII
IS-2Sh
U.S.S.R. Heavy Tank VIII
IS-3 Defender
In 1956–1957, students of the Military Armored Forces Academy designed their diploma project: installing loading mechanisms on the IS-3 and T-10 heavy tanks. The IS-3 version featured a two-row loading mechanism and its crew was cut down to just three members: a commander, a gunner, and a driver. According to official reports, this tank was only a prototype. However, U.K. reconnaissance reported the production of several thousand of these tanks, preserved in a secret depot.
U.S.S.R. Heavy Tank VIII
Tetrarch
Developed in 1936 by the Vickers-Armstrong company, with a total of 177 vehicles in two basic modifications the Tetrarch Mk I and the Tetrarch Mk ICS manufactured from 1941 through 1942. In 1942 twenty vehicles were delivered to the U.S.S.R. under Lend-Lease, of which 19 fought on the Eastern Front until October 1943.
U.S.S.R. Light Tank II
M3 Light
The most famous light tank of World War II, with a total of 13,859 vehicles manufactured from 1941 through September 1943. 1,576 tanks (mostly of the M3A1 version) were supplied to the U.S.S.R. under Lend-Lease, and many more to the British.
U.S.S.R. Light Tank III
T-127
Developed together with the T-126 at Factory No. 174 during the summer of 1940. Vehicle development was suspended during the preliminary design phase and then discontinued due to problems with the V-3 diesel engine.
U.S.S.R. Light Tank III
LTP
A proposed light vehicle developed by Lieutenant Provornov in the summer of 1942. No prototypes were manufactured.
U.S.S.R. Light Tank III
BT-7 artillery
In 1934–1935 the design bureau of the Kharkiv Locomotive Factory developed this artillery modification of the BT-7. The new elliptical turret was equipped with the 76.2-mm CT-28 gun. In addition, some vehicles received new radio stations. A total of 155 artillery BT-7s were manufactured. The vehicles saw combat on the Karelian Isthmus, in Manchuria, and during the first period of the Great Patriotic War.
U.S.S.R. Light Tank III
Valentine II
A British tank supplied to the U.S.S.R. under Lend-Lease. A total of 3,782 vehicles were sent to the Soviet Union, with some lost at sea during transport to Murmansk.
U.S.S.R. Light Tank IV
A-32
Experimental medium tank. The A-32 and A-20 were developed and put on trials at the same time. The A-32 was adopted for service and evolved into the T-34.
U.S.S.R. Medium Tank IV
Matilda IV
A British tank supplied to the U.S.S.R. under Lend-Lease. In December 1941, one Matilda vehicle was equipped with the Soviet 76.2-mm ZiS-5 gun and the DT machinegun. As a result, the better penetration rate and use of HE shells significantly increased the firepower. There is no precise data on the large-scale re-equipment of vehicles.
U.S.S.R. Medium Tank V
T-34-85 Victory
This modernization of the T-34 can be considered a new tank. A total of 21,048 vehicles were produced from 1944 through the end of World War II. The T-34-85 Victory is a holiday version of the traditional T-34-85. The tank features special camouflage.
U.S.S.R. Medium Tank VI
T-34-85 Rudy
This fictional T-34-85 tank, identified as Number 102 of the 1st Tank Brigade of the Polish Army, was featured in the Polish TV series "Four Tank-Men and a Dog." In reality, Т-34-85s were produced in Poland in the 1950s at the Bumar Labedy plant, located in Gliwice. The Polish variant was slightly modified from the Soviet tank of the late-war period.
U.S.S.R. Medium Tank VII
T-54 first prototype
Developed at Factory No. 183 in 1944. It was based on the T-44, with many components modified to enhance the armor and armament of the new vehicle. According to one source, the first prototype was built at the end of 1944. However, some other sources mention another date—January 1945. The tank underwent trials in March and April 1945, but never entered mass production.
U.S.S.R. Medium Tank VIII
T14
Developed between May 1942 and May 1943. Two prototypes were manufactured and tested. However, mass production was canceled, and T14 never became more than an experimental vehicle.
U.S.A. Heavy Tank V
M6A2E1
The M6A2E1 was a further development of the T1 and M6 heavy tanks. Developed in August 1944, the vehicle had a larger turret and the 105-mm gun. Never saw mass production.
U.S.A. Heavy Tank VII
T34
Developed in 1945 as a modernization of the T30 heavy tank. The vehicle was equipped with the 120 mm T53 gun and the new Continental AV-1790 engine. Because of the decline in heavy tank development after the end of World War II, the T34 never entered service. The prototypes were used in field trials.
U.S.A. Heavy Tank VIII
M6A2E1 EXP
The M6A2E1 was a further development of the T1 and M6 heavy tanks. Developed in August 1944, the vehicle had a larger turret and the 105-mm gun. Never saw mass production.
U.S.A. Heavy Tank VIII
T34 Independence
In 1945 two prototypes of the T30 were armed with 120 mm guns and redesignated as the T34 Heavy Tank. The vehicle never entered mass production, nor saw service. The T34 Independence is a holiday version featuring special camouflage.
U.S.A. Heavy Tank VIII
T2 Light Tank
The vehicle prototype was designed and built by Rock Island Arsenal in 1933. The chassis and suspension elements of the Vickers Mk. E (Vickers "6-tonner") tank were used. Trials of the T2 prototype were successful, but the T2E1 variant was preferred due to its higher terrain crossing capacity.
U.S.A. Light Tank II
T7 Combat Car
Light wheeled caterpillar vehicle with machineguns, developed for the U.S. cavalry. The trials of the first prototype started in April 1937 and continued until 1939. However, the T7 was discontinued in favor of track-type vehicles.
U.S.A. Light Tank II
M22 Locust
Requirements to a light airmobile tank were created in the winter of 1941. The vehicle was developed by the Marmon-Herrington company. A total of 830 vehicles were produced from April 1943 through February 1944, 260 of which were supplied to the U.K. under Lend-Lease.
U.S.A. Light Tank III
T49 ATM
A modification of the T49 armed with anti-tank guided missiles. This vehicle was available during the Missile Exercise event.
U.S.A. Light Tank VII
Ram II
Developed on the basis of the M3 and produced in Canada from 1942 through the summer of 1943. None of the 1,849 vehicles were ever used in action, although some were used for training purposes.
U.S.A. Medium Tank V
M4A2E4 Sherman
Work on this experimental vehicle started in March 1943. Two prototypes were built by July. The vehicle passed trials, but was never mass-produced or used in action.
U.S.A. Medium Tank V
M4A3E8 Fury
M4A3E8 Fury—sergeant Wardaddy's tank from the movie Fury.
U.S.A. Medium Tank VI
T23E3
Development started in April 1943. The prototype was manufactured in August 1944. Unlike its predecessor T23, this variant featured a torsion-bar suspension. The vehicle never entered mass production nor saw service.
U.S.A. Medium Tank VII
T26E4 SuperPershing
To increase firepower, a new long-barrelled 90-mm gun was mounted on the T26E1 in January 1945. The prototype was designated the T26E4. Development was discontinued in January 1947 due to problems with the gun and the loading mechanism. A total of 25 vehicles had been built by that time, but never entered service.
U.S.A. Medium Tank VIII
M60
A deep modernization of the M48 tank. Development of the prototype was started in 1957, and in 1959 the order for production of the first tank was placed with Chrysler. A total of 15,000 vehicles of four modifications were manufactured.
U.S.A. Medium Tank X
Angry Connor
The Angry Connor is a British Premium Tier V Tank Destroyer with a unique camouflage and its own war history. The vehicle was commanded by Garret O'Connor, an Irish Army officer. He was unable to put up with the fact that Ireland was not participating in World War II, and escaped to England together with several other Irish soldiers. He took active part in military operations and soon became the commander of a Valentine Mk I Archer. O'Connor’s fellow soldiers named the vehicle after its brave and talented commander: the Angry Connor. The distinguishing features of this tank destroyer are its terrifying “warpaint” and a barrel fixed on the hull where, according to the legend, it was hit by a German shell. Nobody knows what is inside the barrel as Garret promised to open it only after the end of the war.
U.K. Tank Destroyer V
AT 15A
Assault tank conceived for breakthrough attacks on enemy fortifications. The design project was ready on October 5, 1943. No prototypes were built. However, the project became the basis for the A39 Tortoise heavy assault tank.
U.K. Tank Destroyer VII
Excelsior
At the end of 1942, the Churchill tank's armament was deemed insufficient. New tanks, the A31, A32, and A33 were developed as new infantry tanks. The A33 was developed by the English Electric Company. The LMS Company participated in the development of suspension for a new tank. Two vehicles, which differed greatly from each other, were manufactured. The A33 was set to go into production, but in 1943 the decision to cancel mass production of the Churchill was reversed, and the order for the A33 was not placed.
U.K. Heavy Tank V
TOG II*
Developed for trench warfare. Initially, armament was to be placed in the front part of the hull and side sponsons. However, later it was decided not to add sponsons but to mount a turret. By 1943, when TOG 2* was completed and ready for trials, it was already obsolete. The vehicle never entered service.
U.K. Heavy Tank VI
Sentinel AC I
WWII Australian cruiser tank. Designed as a vehicle for repulsing the potential Japanese invasion, it remained in service until 1945 only as a training tank.
U.K. Medium Tank IV
Matilda Black Prince
This vehicle features a 6-pounder gun fitted in the A27 turret. Only one prototype was produced, after which development was discontinued due to complications with the turret mounting. The vehicle never entered service.
U.K. Medium Tank V
Cromwell B
The vehicle made famous by the British 7th Armoured Division, who had been dubbed the Desert Rats for their exploits in North Africa. However, the 7th Armoured were not issued with Cromwells until 1944, when they returned to the U.K. to prepare for D-Day. In their Cromwells they fought across France and into Germany, and eventually took part in the Victory Parade on September 7, 1945, in Berlin.
U.K. Medium Tank VI
AC IV Sentinel
The tank was developed in 1943. An order was placed for 400 vehicles. The prototype was created on the basis of the AC 1 tank with an enlarged superstructure, which allowed mounting a modified turret from the AC 3 tank with a 17-pounder gun. In July 1943, the work on the project was stopped at the final stage, as the program for creating the Australian cruiser tank was discontinued.
U.K. Medium Tank VI
Vindicator Ultramarines
The Vindicator is a heavy siege vehicle of the Space Marines from the Warhammer 40,000 universe. This tank destroyer is armed with a destructive huge-caliber gun, created to crush the strongest fortifications. Its shell capacity is more than enough to tear enemy armored vehicles to shreds. The Vindicator's solid front armor is covered by a dozer blade. It functions as a screen and considerably degrades the effectiveness of enemy shells. Warhammer 40,000: Macragge's Thunder © Copyright Games Workshop Limited 2017. All rights reserved to their respective owners.
Hybrid nation Tank Destroyer VII
Helsing H0
Unstoppable Dracula is back from oblivion, and darkness has settled over the world. Duty calls on the vampire hunter to once more fight for the Light and stop this ancient Evil. Helsing’s incarnation is a true masterpiece: a tank destroyer with protective ornaments, specially equipped to fight the spawn of darkness. Helsing’s twin gun automatically fires twice as it’s the only way to stop the formidable Dracula. The Helsing H0 Premium tank destroyer was awarded during the Night Hunt event from October through November 2016.
Hybrid nation Tank Destroyer VII
Blaze WZ 135G FT
The unique Premium Tier VII tank destroyer personifying the fire dragon. The younger brother of the Glacial 112. This inferno brings devastating power, rage, and tenacity to the battlefield. An eternal rival of his elder brother, they always go toe to toe. The Blaze WZ 135G FT was awarded during the New Moon event in 2017.
Hybrid nation Tank Destroyer VII
Predator Ultramarines
The Predator is the primary combat vehicle of the Space Marines from the Warhammer 40,000 universe. The heavily armored front and strong turret securely protect it against enemy shells, and the quick-firing automatic gun conveys the Emperor's revenge to any fool who dares stand up against this menacing vehicle. Warhammer 40,000: Macragge's Thunder © Copyright Games Workshop Limited 2017. All rights reserved to their respective owners.
Hybrid nation Heavy Tank VII
Nameless
The Nameless Tank appeared in the popular SEGA title “Valkyria Chronicles”, as the primary assault vehicle for Squad 422, a unit of the regular Gallian army. This unit was known to be composed of deserters and other criminals whose real names had been erased from official records and were instead referred to by numbers. The Nameless was commanded by a Darcsen known as Number 6, although his real name was Gusurg.
Hybrid nation Heavy Tank VII
Lupus
The Lupus first appeared as a boss tank in "Valkyria Chronicles". It was commanded by General Jaeger of the Imperial Army against Squad 7's Edelweiss. The strong main gun and heavy armour of this vehicle makes it a tough contender.
Hybrid nation Heavy Tank VII
Stridsvagn 74A2
As part of development of the Strv 74, a project was proposed for a vehicle with the oscillating turret of the French AMX 13 tank and the 7,5 cm kan strv 74 gun; however, the vehicle was never built.
Hybrid nation Medium Tank VI
Edelweiss
The Edelweiss tank was the hero of the popular SEGA title, “Valkyria Chronicles”, and was commanded by the story's lead character, Welkin Gunther, commander of Squad 7 of the Gallian Militia's 3rd regiment. Although still a prototype, the tank proved formidable in combat thanks to a revolutionary design, incorporating many innovations, which helped it achieve great success on the battlefield.
Hybrid nation Medium Tank VII
T6 Dracula
An ancient prophecy has come to pass: Dracula has returned to fight the final battle against his sworn enemy, Helsing. He has taken the form of a rapid tank that is darker than midnight, with a powerful armament and suspension that restores itself immediately upon damage. This time, Helsing will pay dearly for his previous victory. The T6 Dracula Premium tank was awarded during the Night Hunt event from October through November 2016.
Hybrid nation Medium Tank VII
O-47
Hybrid nation Medium Tank VIII
Hetzer Kame SP
In 1943, the Wehrmacht were experiencing a dire shortage of StuG III tank destroyers because the joint U.S.A.-U.K. air raids caused considerable damage to the Alkett company's factory that produced these vehicles. December 1943, a decision was made to utilize the working capacities of the BMM company in Prague to start production of tank destroyers. Components of the Pz.Kpfw. 38(t) tank were widely used in the new vehicle. The first prototypes were produced in March 1944. More than 2,800 vehicles were built by May 1945.
Japan Tank Destroyer IV
Kuro Mori Mine
The Kuro Mori Mine is a tank of Kuromorimine School, based on the Tiger I. The tank is commanded by Maho Nishizumi, sister of Miho Nishizumi. Miho is also known as the commander of the Panzer IV Anko Special.
Japan Heavy Tank VI
Type 98 Ke-Ni Otsu
A modification of the Type 98A Ke-Ni light tank with the Christie type suspension. Developed by Mitsubishi in 1939 under the influence of the Soviet BT-7. Only one prototype was manufactured.
Japan Light Tank III
Panzer IV Anko Special
Custom variation of the Panzerkampfwagen IV Ausf.D taken from the anime series "Girls und Panzer" where it is operated by the Anglerfish Team. This modification of the Pz.Kpfw. IV Ausf.D has been fully customized to achieve performance equal to its successor’s, the Pz.Kpfw. IV Ausf.H. The vehicle is also distinctive for the original voice-over taken from the anime series.
Japan Medium Tank V
Type 3 Chi-Nu Kai Shinobi
The Type 3 Chi-Nu Kai medium tank is a combination of the Type 3 Chi-Nu suspension and turret and the Type 4 Chi-To gun. Only one prototype was built. It was ready for trials in March of 1945. The special variation model, Type 3 Chi-Nu Kai Shinobi portrays the spirit of the fabled ancient Japanese assassins. Veiled in a sleek black design, "Shinobi" strikes fear in to the heart of its foes.
Japan Medium Tank V
Dicker Max
The Dicker Max ("Fat Max") was initially intended to destroy bunkers. Two prototypes were built in the spring of 1941. Later the vehicle was redesignated a heavy tank destroyer. The design was never put into mass production, but the prototypes fought on the Eastern Front.
Germany Tank Destroyer VI
E 25
The development of the E 25 was part of the "E" program, supervised by the Waffenprüfamt 6 committee. The E 25 was developed by the Argus company (Karlsruhe, Germany) under the supervision of Dr. Herman Klaue. No prototypes were manufactured.
Germany Tank Destroyer VII
8,8 cm Pak 43 Jagdtiger
In 1945, the production order for the Jagdtiger was increased, and the supply of compatible guns became insufficient. As a result, approximately 20 vehicles were equipped with the 8,8 cm PaK 43 L/71 gun.
Germany Tank Destroyer VIII
Snowstorm Jagdtiger 8.8
In 1945, the production order for the Jagdtiger was increased, and the supply of compatible guns became insufficient. As a result, approximately 20 vehicles were equipped with the 8,8 cm PaK 43 L/71 gun. The Snowstorm Jagdtiger 8,8 is a holiday event version of the traditional Jagdtiger 8,8. It was available in the Store only from 17 December 2014 through 5 January 2015.
Germany Tank Destroyer VIII
Großtraktor - Krupp
An experimental medium tank, developed by the Krupp company. By 1929, two prototypes were manufactured from non-armored steel and underwent trials in the Soviet Union until 1933. The trials revealed multiple faults, and the vehicle never saw service. However, the results of vehicle development were later used by German engineers.
Germany Heavy Tank III
Pz.Kpfw. B2 740 (f)
During the European campaign, German troops captured 161 heavy B1 bis tanks that later received the Pz.Kpfw. B2 740 (f) designation. All vehicles were upgraded and received German radio equipment and twofold hatches on commander's cupolas. Some vehicles with dismantled armament were used for training purposes, and 16 vehicles were transformed into self-propelled howitzers. Most vehicles were converted into flame throwing tanks.
Germany Heavy Tank IV
VK 45.03
Heavy tank developed at the end of WWII. The project was designated the Tiger III (VK 45.03) on October 12, 1942. Existed only in blueprints.
Germany Heavy Tank VII
Tankenstein
Tankenstein is a unique vehicle created for Halloween 2015. The tank consists of modules from other vehicles and features special camouflage and appearance. According to some secret dispatches, a surreptitious community of German scientists was involved in the creation of Tankenstein.
Germany Heavy Tank VII
Löwe
Development of this 70-ton super-heavy tank started on November 1, 1941. In February 1942, the Krupp company suggested the VK 70.01 avant project, later designated the Löwe ("Lion"). Several designs varying in configuration, armament, and armor, were drafted. However, the project was canceled after the Führer made the decision to develop even heavier tanks. No prototypes were ever built.
Germany Heavy Tank VIII
KpfPz 70
An American-German collaboration from the 1960s, also known as the MBT-70. The vehicle never entered mass production because of disagreements between the parties. Later, the project split into two national programs. The KpfPz 70 was available during the Missile Exercise game event.
Germany Heavy Tank IX
Pz.Kpfw. 38H 735 (f)
In May 1940 the French Army had more than 800 vehicles of this type, most of which were captured by the German forces. They were widely used by the Wehrmacht to supplement existing armor.
Germany Light Tank II
Pz.Kpfw. II Ausf. J
Reconnaissance tank with reinforced armor. The vehicle was a further development of the Pz.Kpfw II. In October 1939, a preproduction batch was ordered, and the first prototype was built in July 1940. From 1943 through 1944, seven vehicles were used by the 12th Panzer Division on the Eastern Front. A total of 22 tanks were manufactured.
Germany Light Tank III
T-15
This experimental light tank was developed at the Škoda factory in 1941–1943, with a total of five prototypes manufactured. The vehicle was never mass-produced, nor saw service.
Germany Light Tank III
leKpz M 41 90 mm
The German modification of the M41A1 Walker Bulldog U.S. light tank. Major changes were introduced to the 76 mm gun M32, which was reamed out to 90 mm and shortened by 425 mm.
Germany Light Tank VIII
Pz.Kpfw. S35 739 (f)
Some of 400 of these French tanks were captured by the German Army. They were later used for training purposes and on secondary fronts.
Germany Medium Tank III
Pz.Kpfw. V/IV
This vehicle was produced by the Maintenance and Recovery Company of the 653rd Heavy Panzerjäger Battalion on the basis of the Bergepanther ARV and the Pz. IV turret.
Germany Medium Tank V
T-25
The vehicle was developed by the Škoda company under the Panzer Development Program initiated by the Heer (German Army land forces). The T-25 existed only in blueprints.
Germany Medium Tank V
Pz.Kpfw. IV hydrostat.
This experimental version of the Pz.Kpfw. IV Ausf. G, incorporating hydrostatic drive, began development in 1944. Trials were discontinued due to the unreliability of the transmission and the lack of spare parts.
Germany Medium Tank V
Pz.Kpfw. IV Schmalturm
On 25 May 1944, Jurgen Lukash, an engineer from the Krupp company, presented an experimental tank model based on the Pz. Kpfw. IV Schmalturm. The Starchaser was not approved by top management. But Stephen Pilberg, the famous philanthropist, invested $11 million in this project, which allowed a test version to be released on 25 May 1947. According to intelligence data, the tank was manufactured from metals mined at meteorite impact sites. The source of information that allowed the young engineer to create this unusual tank, remained a secret. The creator of the tank disappeared under mysterious circumstances together with all his blueprints. He was last seen on the lawn in front of his house, not far from Ludwigsburg: the engineer was musing on the starry sky…
Germany Medium Tank VI
Panther/M10
During the preparation of Otto Skorzeny's Panzerbrigade 150 for the Ardennes offensive, four Panther tanks were disguised as M10 tank destroyers. The tank brigade was to carry out diversions deep behind the allied lines. All vehicles were lost during the battle with the 120th U.S. Infantry Regiment on February 21, 1945.
Germany Medium Tank VII
Panther mit 8,8 cm L/71
Development of a modification of the Panther started in the spring of 1944. The new variant was to incorporate a newly designed Schmalturm turret. The new vehicle was designated the Panther Ausf. F. On January 23, 1945, it was reported that the 88-mm gun of the Tiger was mounted on the upgraded version of the new turret. A large number of hulls for the vehicle were manufactured, but the turret never saw production and existed only as a wooden model.
Germany Medium Tank VIII
FCM 36 Pak 40
In 1943, ten FCM 36 tanks captured by the Germans were converted into tank destroyers. The vehicles fought in France with the Verstärkte Schnelle Brigade West.
France Tank Destroyer III
AMX Chasseur de chars
In 1946, the AMX company presented this design for a new vehicle. The powerful engine and light weight would have made the vehicle highly mobile, and the 90-mm gun was equipped with a mechanical ammunition system for a high rate of fire. However, the large dimensions of the vehicle, its thin armor, high cost, and the complexity of the design made it unappealing, and the project never advanced to a prototype.
France Medium Tank VIII
FCM 50 t
Development was started in December 1945. The vehicle was conceived as an alternative for the AMX 50t and combined archaic features typical of the pre-war French tank-construction industry as well as German innovations. The vehicle was to be equipped with an additional container trailer, equipment for underwater driving, and a demountable mine clearer.
France Medium Tank VIII
Glacial 112
The unique Premium Tier VIII heavy tank personifying the ice dragon. A bitter rival of the Blaze WZ 135G FT. Cold and resolute, the ice dragon calms and counterbalances the explosive character of his younger brother. These two are always together but remain in eternal confrontation. The Glacial 112 was awarded during the New Moon event in 2017.
China Heavy Tank VIII
Type 62
Development of a lightweight version of the Type 59 tank started in 1957. The new tank was designed to fight in the mountainous and boggy terrain of South China. The first prototype was built in 1962. Later the vehicle underwent several modernizations. A special game modification of this vehicle, the Type 62 Dragon, features some national flavor: an image of a traditional Chinese dragon covers its hull and turret.
China Light Tank VII
Type 59
Chinese medium tank. Initially, the vehicle was a copy of the Soviet medium T-54A tank. The Type 59 entered service in 1959. The first tanks manufactured had no gun stabilizer or night-vision device. Later the vehicle underwent several modernizations. Between 6,000 and 9,500 vehicles of all variants were manufactured from 1958 through 1987.
China Medium Tank VIII